Click2Science Crosswalk of Standards

Click2SciencePD resources are designed to help out-of-school time program staff build skills for facilitating quality STEM learning in their programs. By using our resources, out-of-school time practitioners will be able to help youth learn and practice many of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Providing opportunities for out-of-school staff to obtain professional development using Click2SciencePD can build their skills to support youth in fulfilling math, science, and language standards. The tools below are designed to help afterschool staff, directors, and curriculum specialists understand how Click2SciencePD helps staff facilitate learning that meets CCSS and NGSS standards.

Example of How to Use the Crosswalk

Step 1: Identify CCSS/NGSS Standards

For example, suppose that some of the youth in your program are interested in how airplanes fly. You can make the most of their interest and help them build science, math, and language skills. To do so, you can use the CCSS and NGSS Standards Chart below to identify standards that correspond with the subject and learning experience. Understanding and learning about how airplanes fly could include the following practices and skills from the CCSS and NGSS Standards Chart:

  • Math (CCSS): M2, M4, M7
  • English (CCSS): E1, E2, E3
  • Science/Engineering Practices (NGSS): S2, S3, S4, S6
  • Disciplinary Core Ideas (NGSS): Earth space science content, physical science content
  • Crosscutting Concepts (NGSS): 2, 3

Depending on how youth explore and learn about flight and airplanes, there might be connections with other standards and practices.

Step 2: Identify Click2SciencePD Skills to Practice

Youth could explore this subject by reading about flight, making model airplanes, testing their models, making notes in science journals, and sharing the results. Staff could consider all of the skills in Click2Science in Set 1 from the Click2SciencePD Crosswalk Chart.

Using Table 2, staff can consider which of the 20 Skills that Make STEM Click can help them facilitate youth learning for a standard identified in Table 1. They would want to consider how to select curriculum and/or activities, prepare themselves by understanding the science and engineering practices, maximize the space, create a safe space, and perhaps invite community partners to participate.

CCSS & NGSS Standards Chart

Below you will find a listing of math, science, and English language practices and skills which the CCSS and NGSS standards are based on. The table also shows the connection between math, science, and English language arts from CCSS, NGSS, and the National Research Council science and engineering practices. The table lists the Crosscutting Concepts and Disciplinary Core Ideas from NGSS. These concepts are fundamental to both CCSS and NGSS.

CCSS

Common Core State Standards (CCSS)

Math Practices CCSS Standards English Language Arts (ELA) CCSS Standards
M1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them E1. Demonstrate independence in reading complex texts, and writing and speaking about them
M2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively E2. Build a strong base of knowledge through content rich texts
M3. Construct viable arguments and critique reasoning of others E3. Obtain, synthesize, and report findings clearly and effectively in response to task and purpose
M4. Model with mathematics E4. Construct viable arguments and critique reasoning of others
M5. Use appropriate tools strategically E5. Read, write, and speak grounded in evidence
M6. Attend to precision E6. Use technology and digital media strategically and capably
M7. Look for and make use of structure E7. Come to understand other perspectives and cultures through reading, listening, and collaborations
M8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning  

NGSS

Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

Science and Engineering Practices NGSS Standards Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI) Crosscutting Concepts
S1. Ask questions and define problems Earth space science content 1. Patterns
S2. Develop and use models Life science content 2. Cause and effect: Mechanism and explanation
S3. Plan and carry out investigations Physical science content 3. Scale, proportion, and quantity
S4. Analyze and interpret data   4. Systems and system models
S5. Use mathematics and computational thinking   5. Energy and matter
S6. Construct explanations and design solutions   6. Structure and function
S7. Engage in argument from evidence   7. Stability and change
S8. Obtain, evaluate and communicate information    
Source: Next Generation Science Standards. June 2013. http://www.nextgenscience.org and Common Core State Standards. June 2010. http://www.corestandards.org

Click2SciencePD & Standards Crosswalk Chart

Below you will find each of the strategies and supporting skills, as well as a description of the skill, the CCSS and NGSS related standards, and how you can use Click2Science to support learning and practicing the standards.

The following information is provided to help afterschool practitioners understand the connections between the Click2Science skills and the science standards. Providing appropriate hands-on, inquiry based activities can help students become confident in their skills as well as strengthening their science and engineering identity. Quality STEM learning will include opportunities to learn science and engineering practices in a safe learning space with staff who are comfortable in their skills and willingness to learn with youth in their programs.

Strategy: Preparing for Success in STEM

Skill & Description CCSS NGSS

Preparing STEM learning Opportunities

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will prepare high-quality, STEM activities for youth.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Indicate how well a given STEM activity allows youth to conduct hands-on explorations and investigations.
  • Determine whether an activity connects to youths' daily lives.
  • Adapt STEM activities to the unpredictable environment of out-of-school learning and to their specific program's needs.
  • Design activities that begin with play and move toward systematic engagement.
  • Select appropriate STEM activities for out-of-school programs.
  • Organize materials for learning.
  • Plan opportunities for youth to use science and engineering practices with creativity and imagination.

 

MS

 

Appendix D

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

Creating STEM Learning Environments

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers arrange their environment to maximize youth engagement and support physical and emotional safety during STEM activity

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Identify and mitigate risks to youth safety, such as trip hazards, sharp objects, or dangerous substances.
  • Investigate science phenomena outdoors and in the local community.
  • Arrange materials, seating, or other factors so that the space feels different than traditional school settings (avoiding desks in rows, facing front, teacher standing at whiteboard, etc.).
  • Create a respectful, supportive learning environment that encourages youth to engage with new ideas and different perspectives.

 

 

Strategy: Supporting Youth Development through STEM

Skill & Description CCSS NGSS

Connecting to Prior Knowledge & Experiences

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to effectively connect STEM activities to the knowledge and experiences (culture, gender, socioeconomic status, language, daily experiences, etc.) of the youth in their program.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Assess the prior knowledge, context, and experiences youth bring to STEM learning.
  • Incorporate the experiences of youth into STEM programming.
  • Portray science as a real, social, lived experience that is relevant to youth.
  • Connect afterschool STEM activities to what youth are learning in school

 

 

Appendix D

Giving Youth Control

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will provide opportunities for youth to direct and manage their own learning.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Describe the impact of self-determination, goal-setting, and decision making in preparing youth to be contributors to STEM.
  • Consider youth interests and identities in planning learning experiences.
  • Ask youth for their input in program design and incorporate that feedback in meaningful ways.
  • Encourage all youth to explore and express their interests during STEM activities

 

E1

 

Managing Groups During STEM/h4>

Purpose:Frontline staff and volunteers will manage behavior of youth during STEM activities.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Manipulate the activity structure, environment, and interactions in order to contribute to youth learning.
  • Recognize and highlight positive youth behavior.
  • Design compelling STEM learning activities to motivate student participation.

 

E7

 

Encouraging Collaboration

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will understand that collaboration and interaction are necessary in science and engineering learning experiences. They will be able to effectively facilitate collaborative STEM learning experiences.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Portray science as a collaborative effort that involves groups of people working together.
  • Design STEM activities for youth to practice cooperation and collaboration.
  • Directly teach what collaborative behavior looks and sounds like.
  • Engage all learners in STEM activities.

 

E7
E7

 

Appendix D

Explain, Solve Problems

Making Connections to STEM Careers

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to connect their program to the work of STEM professionals.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Identify ways youth could engage in STEM in the future.
  • Introduce STEM role models that relate to the real world of the youth including diversity in gender, race, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity.
  • Engage with local partners to connect youth to STEM opportunities and role models in their community.
  • Connect real-world STEM skills to activities they are facilitating.

 

 

Appendix D

Developing a STEM Identity

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will support youth in viewing themselves as someone who learns about, uses, and sometimes contributes to science – someone who has a personal identity as a science learner.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Describe real-world benefits for youth in using and contributing to science and engineering now and in the future.
  • Engage youth in science and engineering practices in ways that allow them to make authentic contributions to STEM.
  • Design activities that support a positive attitude toward science.
  • Respond to the interests of youth in order to plan activities that develop their STEM identities.

 

 

Appendix D

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

Facilitating Inclusive Learning Experiences

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will design and continually attend to the social and emotional safety of youth and respond to inequities when they occur.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Identify the needs of historically non-dominant students at their site, especially students of racial/ethnic minority groups and girls.
  • Develop a plan to address bullying or other negative behavior.
  • Teach youth strategies for positive relationship-building.
  • Confront hurtful behavior with youth and help colleagues address hurtful behavior.
  • Support student frustration while practicing STEM.
  • Encourage new ideas and support differing perspectives.
  • Model ways to give and receive constructive criticism, resolve conflict, and make mistakes.

 

 

Appendix D

Strategy: Developing STEM Practices and Mindset

Skill & Description CCSS NGSS

Modeling Engineering Practices

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will facilitate STEM learning experiences for youth to engage in engineering practices, including defining the problem, designing a solution, testing, responding to failure, and optimization.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Design activities to emphasize effort, attention, practice, and persistence.
  • Encourage youth as they try out new skills with imperfect results.
  • Reinforce the understanding that engineers make mistakes and learn from their failures.
  • Support youth to accurately define problems including criteria and constraints
  • Facilitate activities that encourage youth to apply the engineering design process and solve problems
  • Engage youth in solving local problems
  • Identify local engineers to visit your site, like technicians, musical instrument repair specialist, or computer scientist.
  • Keep notes, drawings, or tables to systematically show success and failures.

 

M1

M6

M8

 

S1

S3

S7

S8

Modeling Science Practices

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will facilitate opportunities for youth to apply science practices including investigating questions, using data, and developing explanations.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Model the practices of science for youth.
  • Facilitate science investigations, including opportunities for youth to:
    • Ask questions
    • Collect and analyze data
    • Construct explanations
  • Support youth to talk through their ideas, including developing explanations and communicating their ideas with others.
  • Engage youth in investigating their questions that are important to them and their community
  • Identify local scientists who could visit their site.

 

 

S1

S4

S6

S7

S8

Supporting Documentation of STEM Learning

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to support youth to use a variety of documentation strategies during STEM.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Help youth convey STEM concepts in multiple formats, particularly using symbols, drawings, models, diagrams, charts, tables, text, and non-verbal means.
  • Use a variety of documentation strategies.
  • Support students in writing, drawing, or keeping tables.
  • Connect the process of documenting data, observations, inferences, and conclusions to real-world scientific processes.

 

E5

 

S2

S3

S8

Asking Purposeful Questions

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will utilize purposeful questioning and feedback to increase youth learning in STEM.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Reflect on how purposeful questions can increase STEM learning.
  • Use open-ended questions with youth.
  • Ask clarifying and probing follow-up questions to get students to explain their thinking.
  • Use wait time to allow all students to think.
  • Use whole and small-group discussion management techniques such as "think-pair-share."

 

 

S6

Making Authentic Assessments of STEM Learning

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to evaluate what is learned by youth before, during, and after STEM activities.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Gather evidence about youth knowledge and interest before teaching to plan appropriate and meaningful instruction.
  • Use information gathered during activities to adjust instruction.
  • Provide constructive feedback on STEM knowledge and practices during learning.
  • Evaluate and document youth knowledge, engagement, and skills.
  • Engage youth in the assessment process, such as a rubric design or opportunities to give peer feedback.

 

_

 

DCI

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

Reflecting & Processing STEM Experiences

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will deepen understand and personal meaning-making for youth by facilitating opportunities for reflecting on STEM learning experiences.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Facilitate STEM activities that develop understanding of STEM concepts and develop science and engineering practices.
  • Develop strategies and questions that encourage youth to reflect on what they have learned and develop a personal understanding of STEM concepts.
  • Guide discussion that helps youth make sense of science concepts and science practices.

 

 

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

Enabling Active STEM Learning

Purpose: Frontline staff and volunteers will be able to facilitate active STEM learning experiences.

As a result of ongoing, consistent professional development efforts, frontline staff and volunteers will be able to:

  • Facilitate active learning experiences that allow youth to solve problems and investigate phenomena in meaningful ways.
  • Compare learning outcomes in activities where learners are active to those where learners are passive.
  • Convert activities where learners are passive (listening/reading) to ones where youth are actively engaged in STEM.
  • Facilitate individual and group discussions in which youth develop their own understanding of STEM.

 

 

S3

S6